Pests & Pathogens

Pests & Pathogens




NNYADP: New Way to Apply Biocontrol Nematodes

Last Modified: May 8, 2020

Young Farm Entrepreneur Applying NNYADP Biocontrol Research Results

Last Modified: May 8, 2020

Report Seedcorn Maggot and Wireworm Damage: WE NEED YOUR INPUT

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: April 28, 2020
Report Seedcorn Maggot and Wireworm Damage:  WE NEED YOUR INPUT

NNY Western Bean Cutworm 2019 Report

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: December 9, 2019

Paraquat Certified Applicator Training to Prevent Poisonings Now Available

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: April 16, 2019

What are Mycorrhizae and Should They Factor into Your Crop Management Plans?

Kitty O'Neil, Team Leader, Field Crops & Soils Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: February 5, 2019

Get to Know Herbicide Sites of Action

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: December 4, 2018

New Online Crop Maturity Planning Tool

Kitty O'Neil, Team Leader, Field Crops & Soils Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: December 4, 2018

NNY Western Bean Cutworm Count 2017

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: February 6, 2018

NNY Western Bean Cutworm Moth Trap Summary

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: February 6, 2018

NYS Regist. Insecticides for Armyworm/Cereal Leaf Beetle on Multiple Field Crops

Kitty O'Neil, Team Leader, Field Crops & Soils Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: June 7, 2017

NYS Regist. Insecticides Labeled for Cutworm, WBC/and or Black Cutworm on Corn

Kitty O'Neil, Team Leader, Field Crops & Soils Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: June 7, 2017

Conventional Corn Weed Control

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: April 26, 2017

Over the winter there were a lot of growers asking me about conventional corn weed control options. Some growers are looking to capture potential non-GMO corn premiums, dairy producers are intrigued by the possible GMO free milk markets, others are looking to save money on seed costs and some feel that they need to become more proactive with their herbicide resistance management strategies on the farm.

Regardless of a growers' reason to plant conventional corn, preemergence weed control programs are almost a necessity for a conventional weed control program. It is extremely difficult to rely on a total postemergence conventional weed control program. There is a high risk of yield loss if the postemergence application is delayed. Application delays due to weather conditions can lead to tall weeds that are difficult or too big to control.

Conventional Soybean Control Revisted

Mike Hunter, Field Crops Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: April 26, 2017

Glyphosate resistant (Roundup Ready) soybeans made postemergence weed control relatively easy with a single application. Recently, there have been a renewed interest in conventional soybean weed control options. Many of these soybean growers haven't planted conventional soybeans in well over a decade and the younger soybean growers have never planted conventional soybeans.

Regardless of a growers' reason to plant conventional soybeans, preemergence weed control programs are almost a necessity for growing conventional soybeans. It is extremely difficult to rely on a total postemergence conventional soybean weed control program. We have limited options for controlling broadleaf weeds with conventional soybean herbicides. It is imperative that we start out with a preemergence herbicide before or at time of planting and then be ready to apply a postemergence application to any weeds that escape. Timing of conventional postemergence soybean herbicides is critical because they won't kill big weeds.

Managing Western Bean Cutworm with Bt's - A Reality Check

Last Modified: January 23, 2017
Managing Western Bean Cutworm with Bt's - A Reality Check

The Western Bean Cutworm (WBC) is an emerging pest in NY that has the potential to cause economic losses in field corn, sweet corn and dry beans. Since 2010, the presence of WBC moths throughout the state have been monitored using bucket traps with pheromone lures. Based on these WBC trap monitoring efforts, Northern New York (NNY) is considered a "hot spot" for the Western Bean Cutworm in New York State.

NNY Ear to the Ground

Kitty O'Neil, Team Leader, Field Crops & Soils Specialist
North Country Regional Ag Team

Last Modified: June 28, 2016



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Upcoming Events

Navigating Solar Lease Agreements and the Solar Development Process: A Program for NY Farmers and Rural Landowners

October 26, 2021
Canton,

You have the opportunity to lease your farmland to a solar energy company! It sounds like a sweet deal, and you are interested, but you are not sure just how it works...

Goat Producers Update on Johnes Disease and How to Have a Clean Herd

October 28, 2021
November 4, 2021

Many producers are curious about how to prove they have a clean flock that is free of diseases like Johnes Disease, CLA and CAE.  The second topic of the talk will be about how to test your herd for these diseases, what the tests tell you, and approximate costs.  It is important to think about what your goals are for the testing program before you start.

Transition Cow Tuesdays

November 2, 2021
November 9, 2021
November 16, 2021
November 23, 2021
November 30, 2021
December 7, 2021
December 14, 2021

Have you… ...been working with the farm transition cow program but want to know more about the how, what and why? ...wanted to improve the transition cow performance of your herd but need to know where to start? ...wanted to increase the skills you bring to the farm or your farm employer? ...been wondering where you'll find the time to attend a course or workshop?

If so, this webinar series is designed for you


Announcements

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly across the world.

Although cities have the most sick people, the disease has reached rural communities of New York as well. Everyone needs to take this very seriously. Agriculture is an essential business, so many of us will continue to go to work. However, we all need to take precautions to stay safe and help prevent further spread of the disease. The key things to do are limit contact with other people and keep everything very clean. We've prepared a new resource to help Spanish- and English-speaking farm employees access credible, multi-lingual information that they can use right away. Here are this links to a printable resource for farms to use:
English COVID 19 Procedures
Spanish COVID 19 Procedures


To see a full list of other relevant resources, click here.




How to Manage COVID-19 Risk on Dairy Farms

Straightforward helpful steps to manage risk on dairy farms!  We are happy to help talk farms through these steps and develop risk management plans for protecting owners and team members. Reach out to Kelsey O'Shea via email kio3@cornell.edu for more information.



Update - Regional Ag Team Operations during COVID-19

Click here to get the updated information on our operations.


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